Published On: Fri, Jun 10th, 2016

Review : Do Lafzon Ki Kahani (Randeep Hooda, Kajal Aggarwal)

Do-Lafzon-Ki-KahaniRelease date : June 10, 2016

Director : Deepak Tijori

Producer : Dhaval Jayantilal Gada

Music Director : Aruna Harjai, Ankit Tiwari

Starring : Randeep Hooda, Kajal Aggarwal

Adapted from the 2011 released South Korean film “Always”, “Do Lafzon Ki Kahani” is the love story of a soft-hearted boxer named Suraj (Randeep Hooda) and a blind girl (Kajal Agarwal).

Narrated in a non-linear fashion the plot, which unfolds meticulously and intriguingly in a contrived manner, relies heavily on fate or coincidences to propel it forward.

Set in Malaysia, Suraj is an ex-boxer with a haunting past. He multi-tasks and works two shifts a day to keep himself occupied. It is when he is working on his second shift, as a security guard in a parking lot, that he forges a friendship with a vivacious blind girl named Jenny Mathais, who drops into his cabin for a popular Indian TV show “Main Bindiya Tere Maathe Ki”.

As their romance progresses, Suraj seeks forgiveness from his friend Omi (Mamik) and his ex-gym owner. It is then that we are given a glimpse of Suraj’s violent past, his reformation, redemption and love story.

Jenny too has her share of secrets, about her parents and how she became blind. After all secrets are ironed out, Suraj decides to make amends and start afresh. This includes gathering funds for Jenny’s eye operation.

And what he does as repentance and for his love, forms the crux of the tale.

As usual, Randeep Hooda shows great passion for becoming his character. He nails his role as a compassionate, yet rugged boxer, Suraj. He delivers heft, as well as beefcake, and transfixes you in his pivotal moment of transformations.

Kajal Agarwal too is sincere and like many actors portraying blindness, she portrays a glazed-eye look efficiently and yet manages to imbue her character with a touching veneer.

Mamik Singh is wasted in an insignificant role as Suraj’s friend Omi.

Girish Damija’s script has a heart which moves on a slow pace. The narrative lingers effectively. While Randeep’s character is well-etched and rounded, Jenny’s part floats on an ambiguous scale – from a blind school teacher, teaching students clay moulding to a physiotherapist.

Technically, the film is well designed. Mohana Krishna’s camera work is steady and noteworthy. His frames, captured from various angles, artistically arrests the visuals, which include Randeep’s haunting performance. And his tight frames are manipulative.

The music by Aruna Harjai and Ankit Tiwari seamlessly meshes with the narration. The songs are lilting and mellifluous and bring out the essence of the moments.

Overall, “Do Lafzon Ki Kahani” is a sentimental film that will woo any romantic.